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Recipe: Grenadine

While a common ingredient in cocktails, grenadine these days is most often found in the shape of a Rose’s bottle on the shelf at your local liquor store for some outrageous sum (hint: you can replicate the product easily simply by adding red food coloring to a far cheaper bottle of corn syrup).  Its origins were not always so ignoble, however; once upon a time, the stuff was made from pomegranate juice.  Indeed, if you’ll excuse the quick bit of language pedantry, grenadine’s name comes from the French grenada; our term for its source fruit likely comes from their pomme-grenada, “seeded apple”.

One could argue that, given the extremely small amounts generally used in a given cocktail, grenadine suffers no particular loss from its gradual cheapening into what is effectively red syrup.  The Rebel Bartender, however, being a bit of a snob, suggests that you make your own classic grenadine – it’s surprisingly easy, and lends a vibrant color to whatever infusion you happen to adulterate it with.

Grenadine

1 cup 100% pomegranate juice
1/2 cup sugar

Put juice in saucepan and heat on medium for a minute or two; whisk in sugar.  Continue whisking until thoroughly dissolved, then cool and funnel into clean container of your choice.  Cover and refrigerate; should keep for at least a month.

Photo of Rose’s Grenadine stolen from BevMo’s website.

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