Category Archives: On the Rocks

Bisbee Pride Commemorative Recipe: Bisbee Fruit Salad

While technically an original recipe, at least part of the credit for this drink goes to the (sadly unknown) bartender who was working the pool party at Bisbee Pride last weekend.  The poolside bar was surprisingly well-stocked, and upon arrival at the head of the line a bottle of Ketel One Oranje caught your Bartender’s eye.  Asking the attendant what she recommended to go with it, she gave it a moment’s thought and said, “Cranberry juice and 7up.”  And really, given that context, what kind of even halfway-adventuresome person would say no to a little experimentation?

Admittedly, the end result you see here is rather different from that first trial.  For one thing, the version she poured was nearly half vodka, and tasted like it; for another, it was a bit oversweet, and lacked a certain complexity that the Bartender appreciates in a drink.  However, it had potential, and looking around at the bevy of fruity types around at that moment, it seemed appropriate that the Bartender find some way to commemorate the occasion in the way its participants would most appreciate:  in drink.

Bisbee Fruit Salad

1 ounce Ketel One Oranje
3/4 ounce melon liqueur
Cranberry juice
Seltzer Water

Pour orange vodka and melon liqueur over ice in rocks glass.  Fill until three-quarters full with cranberry juice; top with seltzer water.  Garnish with fresh raspberries and a sprig of mint.

Note:  This recipe can easily be adapted for a tall glass as well; however, you may wish to increase the proportions of the alcoholic ingredients to maintain the balance of flavors.

Recipe: Blushing Duchess

Aside from sounding like an inn in medieval Europe, this is a delightful drink that makes for an excellent summer afternoon pick-me-up (or put-me-down – it may not taste like it, but the Duchess is blushing for a reason!).  It’s also one of the few drinks that needs no extra touches for presentation; a mint sprig would add a nice dash of color if one is feeling particularly ambitious, but otherwise, the drink itself is lovely to behold.

A few notes regarding the ingredients:

  • Turbinado sugar is a type of raw sugar that you can find for obscene prices in the supermarket’s baking aisle, or for quite reasonable prices in bulk at the local co-op or health food store.  (If you’ve ever tried Sugar in the Raw, you know what to look for.)  You can substitute plain white sugar in a pinch, but turbinado has the dual advantage of the superior flavor and prettier presentation.
  • The quality of your grapefruit will make a significant difference here; if you can get it, the Bartender especially recommends fresh Arizona grapefruit due to its soft texture and sweeter flavor.  Be careful, though – the stuff is like citrus crack.  Once you start buying it you may not be able to stop.
  • The recipe is originally from Grey Goose’s website (with, of course, a couple of tweaks); the Bartender discovered it as part of her ongoing campaign to find a drink that makes the stuff worth the $30ish price tag.  Having tried it with both Goose and with Skyy (her standby mixer), she can safely recommend that one use higher-quality vodka in this drink; the grapefruit helps hide the harshness, but Skyy’s bitter flavor still came out strongly.  If you don’t feel like shelling out for Goose, however, something less expensive but still quality like Ketel One would probably do the trick nicely.  Edit, 4/27/11:  Having tried it with Ketel One, the Bartender actually recommends it over Goose for this drink – K-1′s citrus overtones, rather than being overwhelmed as expected, in fact complement the grapefruit beautifully.

And now, the recipe!

Blushing Duchess

Turbinado sugar
3 wedges of grapefruit, peeled/seeded
2 ounces vodka
1 ounce triple sec
Lime wedge

Run the inside of a grapefruit peel around the rim of a rocks glass and coat it with turbinado sugar.  Roll the grapefruit wedges in remaining sugar and put them in the bottom of a shaker; muddle vigorously.  Add vodka, triple sec, and ice; shake, then pour everything (including ice and grapefruit wedges) into the rocks glass.  Squeeze the wedge of lime into the drink and serve!

Recipe: Whiskey Sour

Now that we’ve addressed Jim Beam bourbon, it only seems appropriate for the Bartender to document the classic recipe it might as well have been custom-designed for – the Whiskey Sour.

Note that the recipe specifies bourbon whiskey; this is not an arbitrary designation.  The lemon juice helps to tamp down the sweetness and bring the sour notes of the whiskey to the forefront, while the syrup blunts its harshness.  Considering the complete and utter lack of subtlety in any of the base ingredients, the result is surprisingly complex.

The official recipe includes a dash of egg white in the ingredients, but there appears to be some debate as to whether or not it’s an optional inclusion; given that this is a blog dedicated to doing things for oneself rather than following tradition, the Bartender tried it and discovered that the only noticeable difference is cosmetic.  Therefore, the Bartender recommends that the aspiring mixologist weigh the pleasing aesthetics of the white foam at the top against the (admittedly small) possibility of poisoning from the raw egg, and choose accordingly.

Whiskey Sour

1 1/2 oz bourbon whiskey
1 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz simple syrup

Shake and strain over ice in a rocks glass.  Garnish with two maraschino cherries, or a cherry and an orange slice.

Source:  IBA Official Cocktail recipe

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