Recipe: Adam & Eve Martini

This recipe comes courtesy of the folks who make the Wild Hibiscus Flowers in Syrup, and it nicely showcases both the aesthetic and flavor-related strengths of their product; so far as the Bartender’s cocktail-learning quest is concerned, it also demonstrated the supreme importance of using good-quality spirits when mixing a drink.  In this instance, she initially thought the drink interesting but a little bitter; when a bit of tinkering with the ingredients failed to produce something more palatable, she set the recipe aside.

Revisiting it some time later and with a far greater vodka selection, the Bartender decided to try making it with Kirkland Signature vodka.  And lo and behold – a drink that had previously been mostly a novelty suddenly became extremely tasty.  (For the record, plain Skyy is rapidly losing its place on her liquor shelf, although their citrus offering is still excellent.)

This is also an excellent example of how an unusual ingredient and a fancy garnish can really dress up a drink.  If you ordered one of these in a nice bar, it’d probably come served by a uniformed attendant with a price tag bordering on the obscene.

Adam & Eve Martini

2 ounces good-quality vodka
3 ounces apple puree (stage 1 baby food works best)
1 ounce Wild Hibiscus syrup
1 hibiscus blossom + maraschino cherry for garnish

Take one hibiscus blossom and stuff it with a maraschino cherry.  Shake the rest of the ingredients with ice, then strain into glass.  Spear the flower/cherry garnish with a chopstick and lay across the top of your cocktail glass.

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About Ambrosia Rose

Professional drinker, blogger, storyteller, and critic. With a healthy dollop of sarcastic wit on the side.

Posted on 18 July 2011, in Martini Style, Recipes, Vodka-Based and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. This was bitter at first? It looks like it would come across as sweet, even if there was no extra sugar in the apple. Am I underestimating the power of alcohol?

    • It was a surprise to me too, as I figured that between the syrup and the apple puree it’d be plenty sweet. But Skyy has a definite bitter overtone that came right through in this drink. Try a comparison if you don’t believe me.

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